Friday, 13 July 2007

Kurariki "Too Dangerous" for Parole

No shit - as I said the other day. This is what the Parole Board based i's decision on:
Having considered all the material and submissions before it, the Board concludes that it is not satisfied that to release Bailey Junior Kurariki on parole at this time, he would not pose an undue risk to the safety of the community whilst on parole.

Though intelligent and with considerable potential, Bailey Junior Kurariki is yet quite immature. Understandably, having been imprisoned at the age of 12, he has in crucial maturing years missed much of the expected maturing effects the ‘normal’ community environment might provide. The prison has substituted for that. His views and expectations of life and the community on release clearly show a lack of understanding of the nature and dynamics of the environment, and the characteristics to be addressed by him in making the significant adjustment on release. He has an over expectant and perhaps unrealistic view of the nature and quality of his family influence. He has little understanding of himself. We are concerned about the effect notoriety has had on him over the years, and on the behaviour of others who might associate with him on release.

We are told of recent changes in Mr Kurariki’s prison behaviour. Though he admits his violence in prison, he explains it by his need to survive in the jail. There have been no significant incidents since July 2006. We are concerned whether that change is merely temporary and designed for parole, or is in fact a commitment to doing things differently.

We acknowledge what intervention there has been by courses in the prison. We are not satisfied having spoken with him that those courses and counselling, both by their nature or extent and their impact or effect on him, have been sufficient to provide Mr Kurariki with the insight or skills to on his own handle the pressures of release and temptation to further offend. We are not satisfied that he understands the dynamic factors that underpinned his offending at the age of 12 or indeed since along the way against prison rules and discipline.

The Psychologist for the reasons outlined in the report assesses Mr Kurariki as continuing to be at very high risk of general and violent re-offending.

(http://www.paroleboard.govt.nz/nzpb/media/decisions/kurariki-bailey-junior.html)
It is pretty obvious that this kid, imprisoned at twelve, hasn't been given the help he needs to come to deal with his part n the brutal killing of Michael Choy. The board say that "having been imprisoned at the age of 12, he has in crucial maturing years missed much of the expected maturing effects the ‘normal’ community environment might provide," which completely misses the point. I'm willing to bet the twelve years of kurariki's life prior to the killing of Choy weren't a "‘normal’ community environment" that would provide "the expected maturing" any human being needs. A few years in the prison system isn't going to resolve the problems Kurariki is carrying around with him, it's a dead cert his time inside will have added to them.

The Parole Board adds, "We are not satisfied that he understands the dynamic factors that underpinned his offending at the age of 12 or indeed since along the way against prison rules and discipline," which is a pretty clear admission of failure to rehabilitate this kid. Then the board
... suggest there must be some reconstruction or construction to replace a serious experience and developmental deficit. There must be a realistic accurate release and reintegration plan formulated, with plans made to cement positive influence and opportunity to avoid relapse ... Perhaps in Mr Kurariki’s case, some form of one to one safe, trusted and confident mentoring might be considered, designed to work the reintegration plan and, with continuity in mind, to begin in prison and extend beyond release for as long as it takes.
Which is a bit fucking late. The Parole Board, clearly taking the piss, announce that "Time we believe is of the essence in these efforts if the safety of the community is to be ensured." Worrying about what we are going to do with him over the next twelve months is futile. Worrying about it when he was imprisoned in the first place might have meant something. Worrying about it seventeen years ago when he was born might have meant something more.

He did something terrible, because he was already, by age twelve, a tremendously fucked up person. We've made him worse, and, next year, he's going to get out no matter how utterly unprepared he is to confront what he did or what he is going to experience outside. We had a chance to save him after he killed Choy, and a million chances before, but we didn't bother trying. This pathetic, miserable story simply shows how fucked up New Zealand society is. Kids Like Kurariki grow up with all innocence and enpathy beaten out of them, and people like Michael Choy and his family pay the price of our "don't give a fuck" attitude.

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